Labor Day Weekend Pond Fishing

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My youngest son Jeb and I went out fishing this morning, while Michelle prepared a picnic, with her family coming over in the afternoon.  We both caught several fish, but nothing to brag about.

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I caught this bass using a Stanley Ribbit (soft plastic frog).  It was a classic strike, as I twitched the frog off of a lily pad, and bam!

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Rose mallow hibiscus.

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Pickerelweed, with the word “pickerel” meaning any manner of small, long pike-type fish.

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Blue vervain.

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Pink smartweed, one of most favorite foods (seeds) of ducks.

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Field mint.

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It’s hard to fish this pond due to the littoral fringe of emergent, floating and submerged plants.  Most all of the fish caught came right at the ecotone edge of the submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) to open water, as the bass hide along the edge of the cover in ambush mode.

These distinct ecotones also designate water depths with emergent cattail, pickerelweed, arrowhead, soft-stem bulrush and woolgrass denoting a saturated and inundated condition, the fragrant water lily occurring in about one-foot of water, and then the SAV growing to 2-plus feet, with depth of penetrating sunlight stopping growth into deeper water.

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Fragrant water lily, with an absolutely wonderful fragrance.

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Pickerel frog.

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Once I got too close, the frog jumped into a fresh deer track, and then into the pond.

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Heal-all.

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Jeb spotted this green frog right in front of us, which was hiding in a patch of alien Arthraxon hispidus, an invasive grass that likes sunny, wet ground.

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Nut sedge.

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New England aster, with cabbage butterfly.

 

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